Call to Family, Community and Participation

We believe the person is not only sacred but also social. Already in Genesis we learn that God did not create us to be alone (Genesis 2:18.) We obviously see this principle at work in the gospels: Jesus often preached about the common good, calling the political leaders to social responsibility, and he himself spent little time before he called his disciples, whom he called “to be with him.” (Mark 3:14)

We believe that the organization of society—in economics, politics, and law and policy—directly affects human dignity and the capacity of individuals to grow in community. Among many other implications, this is the foundation for the church’s right to intervene in the political realm—what we all know and call “lobbying.” We not only believe we have to “influence” consciences, but also influence laws and policies.

Do you remember when we warned you that some of these principles would sound conservative and others would sound progressive? One the one hand, this principle favors the progressive view of community and “common good”—in contrast with conservative “individualism”— but favors the more conservative sensitivity when stating that marriage and the family are the basic unit for the organization of society.

Accordingly, Catholic Social Teaching opposes collectivist approaches such as Communism, but at the same time it also rejects unrestricted free-market policies, which operate under the notion that free-reigned capitalism automatically produces a just society.

A more spiritual wording of this principle would be the belief that the human person can only attain his or her full potential in relationship with others. It also takes us to the saying we have often preached about, “Faith is personal, but not private.” In terms of our own sinfulness, the principle is also an invitation to move from a very individualistic, puritan sense of sin, to considering more our sinfulness in social terms: what effect our actions and beliefs (“in my words and in my thoughts”) have upon others.

We believe that individuals are called to participate in society, as a right and responsibility. We are called to seek together the common good and the well-being of all, but especially the poor and vulnerable. This “social responsibility” takes us to the next two principles: (3) Rights and Responsibilities and, (4) Option for the Poor and Vulnerable.

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